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Study of a Laurel Branch

John Ruskin (1819-1900)

D.1953.3

Title Study of a Laurel Branch
Object type Drawing
Artist/maker John Ruskin (1819-1900)
Support Paper (Light-Blue)
Medium Pen And Ink (Brown)
Dimensions h:243 w:150 mm
Accession Lot Waterhouse, Miss (gift, 1953)
Accession number D.1953.3

Collection Exhibitions : Ruskin : Object Label : D.1953.3

Ruskin enjoyed doing small nature studies such as this, either for their own sake or as part of a lesson. Throughout his adult life, he could not resist the urge to instruct, both in person and by letter. Those to whom he gave often very forthright advice included professional artists, some of whom became extremely irritated and broke off relations with the critic.

Collection Exhibitions : Ruskin : Object Label : D.1953.3

Ruskin enjoyed doing small nature studies such as this, either for their own sake or as part of a lesson. Throughout his adult life, he could not resist the urge to instruct, both in person and by letter. Those to whom he gave often very forthright advice included professional artists, some of whom became extremely irritated and broke off relations with the critic.

John Ruskin (1819-1900)

The greatest art critic and writer of the 19th century, Ruskin was a highly accomplished draughtsman whose drawings were used as teaching tools or to illustrate his numerous publications. His most famous book Modern Painters began as a defence of Turner but moved on to embrace earlier periods and a wider range of subjects; it was published in five volumes between 1843 and 1860. Ruskin is also known for having championed the Pre-Raphaelites in 1851. His writings, which cover subjects as diverse as art to social criticism and the enviroment were hugely influential.